Q10. It is plausible to assume that the higher the ticket for speeding the fewer people will speed (assuming, for the moment, that there is a fixed likelihood of getting caught). Suppose the following curve represents how we expect drivers react (in the aggregate) to the size of speeding tickets.

driving-deterrence-graph.gif

Which point (A, B, C, D) on the graph reflects the fact that some people will take their chances and speed no matter how high the fines are?

Which point (A, B, C, D) on the graph reflects the fact that some people will observe the speed limit even if there are no tickets for speeding? A B C D

Which has a greater “payoff” in terms of increased compliance: raising the fines from nothing to $25 or raising fines from $125 to $150??

If we think of fines as a sort of utilitarian control, what % of people, according to this model, are "sensitive" or respond to this type of control? 0% 20% 60% 80%

What kind of social control would seem to be at work for the first 20% of the drivers?

coercive utilitarian normative organizational panopticism